Brexiteers have been disappointed to learn that although divorce can be used as a simile for Brexit, new divorce laws cannot be used to accelerate the process of the UK leaving the EU.

Lawyers have confirmed that the two things are entirely separate and that the overhaul of divorce laws in England and Wales, to allow couples to split faster, will not apply to Brexit.

Currently, fault-based divorces, where one spouse alleges adultery or unreasonable behaviour, can take as little as six months or the time it takes to hold a referendum. 

In contrast, no-fault divorces, where one spouse just feels a bit like leaving or fancies a blue passport, can take much longer, sometimes two or three years. 

The new law will level the playing field and allow couples to have a quick divorce if one spouse is determined to take back control but no fault is recorded.

Despite the similarities, lawyers stress that the new law has no precedent that can be applied to the UK’s split with the EU.

The divorce law changes follow the Supreme Court’s rejection of a woman’s appeal for divorce after her husband refused to agree to the split.

The woman wanted to divorce her husband of 40 years, on the grounds that she was unhappy in the marriage, and enjoyed her cucumbers with a natural curve. 

But her husband refused to agree to it and the Supreme Court unanimously rejected her appeal.

This meant the couple must remain married until 2020 after which they will enter a transition period.

Lord Justice Brendan Fishlove-Smythe reiterated, “yes, this case does sound very Brexity to the layperson, but they really are very different situations.”